Collier Museum presents “Swamp Angels: A History of Mosquitoes and Mosquito Control”

Posted 7/8/21

There are over 40 species of mosquitoes in Collier County. Nicknamed “Swamp Angels” by early settlers...

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Collier Museum presents “Swamp Angels: A History of Mosquitoes and Mosquito Control”

Posted

The Collier Museum at Government Center is proud to present a new exhibit, “Swamp Angels: A History of Mosquitoes and Mosquito Control.” The exhibit will be on display at the museum June 12 through August 28. The exhibit is a joint project between the museum and the Collier Mosquito Control District.

There are over 40 species of mosquitoes in Collier County. Nicknamed “Swamp Angels” by early settlers, mosquitoes have long been a nuisance and threat to the health of everyone living in Southwest Florida. The wet local environment of marshes, swamps, and mangrove estuaries is a natural breeding ground for mosquitoes. Over the years, humans have developed different methods of controlling the insects, and mosquito control remains an important factor in making Collier County comfortable and safe for residents and visitors.

“This exhibit offers a different take on the history of Florida and our community. As the summer rains begin and the mosquito population is on the rise, we expect that many of our visitors will be able to relate to this topic,” said Museum Manager Stephanie Long. “Don’t worry, no insect repellent is needed to enjoy the exhibit,” she added.

These tiny insects are not only annoying pests, but are also our deadliest predator and have killed more people than any other animal in human history. It is estimated that nearly half of the humans who have ever lived have suffered mosquito-inflicted deaths. Floridians have a long history of dealing with yellow fever and malaria, and newer threats like the zika and West Nile viruses continue to endanger residents of Southwest Florida today.

“The health and welfare of residents and visitors is the primary responsibility and concern of the Collier Mosquito Control District,” says District Executive Director Patrick Linn. “While much has changed in the way we conduct our integrated mosquito management program since our humble beginnings in 1950, our core mission of protecting public health and reducing annoying mosquitoes has remained constant.”

The Collier Museum at Government Center is open Tuesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. It is located at 3331 Tamiami Trail East, Naples, in the county government complex. For more information, please call 239-252-8476 or visit colliermuseums.com.

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