Hot cars and pets are a deadly combination

Posted 7/25/19

Summer is here and it’s hot! Collier County Domestic Animal Services reminds pet owners to think twice before taking an outing with your pet. The last thing anyone wants is an overheated dog. Many …

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Hot cars and pets are a deadly combination

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Summer is here and it’s hot! Collier County Domestic Animal Services reminds pet owners to think twice before taking an outing with your pet. The last thing anyone wants is an overheated dog. Many people think a dog is safe in a car with the windows cracked, but this is not correct. When it is 85 degrees outside, the temperature inside a car can soar up to 102 degrees within 10 minutes. Within 30 minutes temperatures take a drastic toll at 120 degrees. A car acts like an oven, so the hotter it is outside, the more likely it is that a dog will overheat.

Even a brief run into the store may be too long. Dogs do not sweat like humans. They must rely on panting to cool down and therefore their body temperatures tend to rise rapidly. A dog’s normal temperature is between 101 to 102.5 degrees; a dog can only resist a high temperature for a short amount of time before damage from overheating becomes irreversible. Health problems caused by overheating include nerve damage, heart problems, liver damage, brain damage and even death—sometimes in a matter of minutes.

Here are some signs a dog may be over heating:

• Excessive panting
• Excessive drooling
• Increased heart rate

• Trouble breathing
• Disorientation, stumbling or poor coordination
• Diarrhea or vomiting
• Collapse or loss of consciousness
• Seizure
• Respiratory arrest

If there is any chance your dog may need to stay in a hot car, just leave him at home. It’s better to have your dog in a safe, cool place than to risk your pet’s health and well-being in an overheated car.

If you see a dog in a hot car, please immediately call Collier County Domestic Animal Services at (239) 252-PETS, or the Sheriff’s Office at (239) 252-9300.

For more information, call DAS at (239) 252-PETS (7387).

domestic-animal-services, featured, hot-cars, pets

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