October Fire Prevention Month brings safety reminders

Stay safe during the nation’s second most popular holiday for home decorating by following helpful safety tips from leaders in fire prevention technology

Posted 10/21/22

Halloween has quickly become the most decorated holiday next to Christmas …

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October Fire Prevention Month brings safety reminders

Stay safe during the nation’s second most popular holiday for home decorating by following helpful safety tips from leaders in fire prevention technology

Posted

ARLINGTON, Va.  — Halloween has quickly become the most decorated holiday next to Christmas with the National Retail Federation reporting that consumers now spend more than $10 billion annually to cover their homes inside and out with lights, candles and festive displays. While
celebrating the fall season is fun, it’s also a time to pay extra attention to fire safety.

According to National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) statistics, each year home decorations contribute to an average of 1,000 house fires, 53 injuries, six deaths and more than $16 million in property damage.

Electrical safety experts offer a few simple ways to prevent home décor from becoming home devastation during October’s National Fire Prevention Month:

• Ensure light bulbs are screwed in tightly.

• Avoid placing furniture on cords and replace damaged extension cords.
• Don’t overload circuits.
• Use flashlights or flameless candles instead of open flames decorating your home.
• Check extension cords, appliances and lights for any damage before plugging into an outlet.
• Make sure your home is protected with arc fault circuit interrupters (AFCIs), devices designed to detect and stop dangerous arcing before an electrical fire can start.

“Thankfully technologies like arc fault circuit interrupters exist to help prevent electrical fires from occurring in homes, but as an added level of safety we urge homeowners to also keep their eyes open to other preventable issues while they are decorating,” said David Kendall, director of industry affairs at ABB Inc. and member of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association LVDE AFCI Task Force.

For more information on the NEMA LVDE AFCI Task Force visit www.afcisafety.org.

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