USACE to conduct treatments of floating aquatic plants beginning Sept. 13

Posted 9/10/21

In order to meet mission requirements for Federal Navigation and Flood Risk Management, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District, will conduct treatments of floating aquatic plants...

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USACE to conduct treatments of floating aquatic plants beginning Sept. 13

Posted

JACKSONVILLE -- In order to meet mission requirements for Federal Navigation and Flood Risk Management, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District, will conduct treatments of floating aquatic plants (water hyacinth & water lettuce). The Corps area of responsibility includes the south end of the lake from Pelican Bay to Uncle Joe’s Cut including Route 2 from Port Mayaca to Moore Haven and the rim canal from Moore Haven to Old Sportsman’s. Treatment of vegetation will be conducted by a contractor.

Beginning Sept. 13 through Sept. 16 the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) In House Crews will be treating invasive vegetation between Harney pond to 7-Mile cut, including the rim canal in these areas. Specific hot spot areas include the canals, Mctush, 7-mile cut, Fish-eating creek (in lake). These areas are outside of USACE AOR but we are working with interagency coordination and using this as preventative measures so that large amounts of material do not enter the rim canal. Currently large amounts of material including hyacinth and tussocks are threatening to block the rim canal if the right wind direction permits. The goal of this treatment is to be proactive, so this material does not make its way into the rim canal causing blockages. With hurricane season in full swing, being proactive is essential in order to keep our federal navigation waterways open.

If a large blockage occurs in the rim canal harvesters will likely be used in order to remove the blockage. This is the most financial and effective use of harvestors in this area at this time.

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