Charge nurse wins DAISY Award

Posted 3/5/21

Congratulations Gloria Allen, Raulerson Hospital's DAISY Award recipient.

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Charge nurse wins DAISY Award

Posted

OKEECHOBEE - Congratulations to Gloria Allen, a charge nurse from Raulerson Hospital ICU, who was selected as Raulerson's first Quarter DAISY Award recipient. Allen's nomination form, anonymously submitted by a staff member who works with her often, explained to the DAISY Committee she feels at ease and secure any time she works with Allen because of her abundant knowledge of hospital policy and patient safety.

Raulerson Hospital loves to hear about connections  co-workers make with each other! Thank you to everyone who took the time to nominate a nurse.

Raulerson Hospital would like to recognize all  1st quarter nominees: Mario (ER), Vicki (ICU), Mark (Med/Surg), Carl (Med/Surg), Audra (Outpatient) and Melissa Outpatient). 

The DAISY Foundation expresses gratitude to nurses with programs that recognize them for the extraordinary skillful, compassionate care they provide patients and families.

The DAISY Foundation, created to express gratitude by a family that experienced extraordinary nursing, is the leader in meaningful recognition of nurses. Everyone who is involved with DAISY, whether they are presenting the Awards, choosing Honorees, or coordinating the program, is an extension of this family and their expression of this gratitude.

The DAISY Foundation was established by the family of Patrick Barnes, who died in 1999.

According to the DAISY Foundation website, "in late 1999, at the age of 33, Patrick Barnes awoke with some blood blisters in his mouth. Having survived Hodgkins Disease twice, he was admitted to the hospital and diagnosed with the auto-immune disease, ITP (Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura). 

On the website, Pat's father, Mark Barnes explains, "We are so blessed that we were able to spend the eight weeks of his hospitalization with him and his family. During those weeks, we experienced the best of Nursing. We were there to see the clinical skill that dealt with his very complex medical situation, the fast thinking of nurses who saved his life more than once, and that nursing excellence that took years to hone to the best of the profession. But frankly, as a patient family, we rather expected that Pat would have great clinical care. That was why he was in the hospital. What we did not expect was the way his nurses delivered that care - the kindness and compassion they gave Pat and all of us in his family every day. We were awed by the way the nurses touched him and spoke with him, even when he was on a ventilator and totally sedated. The way they informed and educated us eased our minds. They truly helped us through the darkest hours of our lives, with soft voices of hope and strong loving hugs that to this day, we still feel. Just days after he died, we began talking about what we would do to help fill the giant hole in our hearts that Pat’s passing had left. Tena came up with the acronym, DAISY, standing for Diseases Attacking the Immune SYstem, and we filed our papers to become a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization. As we discussed what to do in Patrick’s memory, we knew that first and foremost, we needed to say 'thank you' for the gifts nurses give their patients and families every day, just as we had experienced."

The famnily created The DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nurses and piloted the program at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, whose nurses cared for Patrick during the last weeks of his life. Their goal was to ensure that nurses know how deserving they are of our society's profound respect for the education, training, brainpower, and skill they put into their work, and especially for the caring with which they deliver their care.

The DAISY Award has been adopted by healthcare facilities all over the U.S. and beyond.

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