The History Of Flag Day

Posted 6/14/21

LABELLE - It has been 70 Years since President Truman signed an Act of Congress designating June 14 as National Flag Day.

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The History Of Flag Day

Posted

LABELLE - It has been 70 Years since President Truman signed an Act of Congress designating June 14 as National Flag Day. Flag Day has a long history of showing respect to our country and to ‘Old Glory’ – our Red/White/Blue emblem of freedom.

In 1885 the idea of an annual day specifically celebrating the Flag is believed to have first originated. A school teacher arranged for the pupils in the Wisconsin Public School to observe June 14 (the 108th anniversary of the official adoption of the Stars and Stripes) as ‘Flag Birthday’.

On June 14, 1889, a kindergarten teacher in New York City, planned appropriate ceremonies for the children of his school to observe Flag Day.

On June 14, 1891, the Betsy Ross House in Philadelphia held a Flag Day celebration.

On June 14, 1893 the Superintendent of Public Schools of Philadelphia, directed that Flag Day exercises be held on Independence Square. School children were assembled, each carrying a small Flag, and patriotic songs were sung and addresses delivered.

In 1894, the governor of New York directed that on June 14 the Flag be displayed on all public buildings.

On June 14, 1894 the first general public school children’s celebration of Flag Day in Chicago was held in Douglas, Garfield, Humboldt, Lincoln, and Washington Parks, with more than 300,000 children participating.

In 1914 Franklin K. Lane, Secretary of the Interior, delivered a 1914 Flag Day address in which he said the flag had spoken to him that morning: “I am what you make me; nothing more. I swing before your eyes as a bright gleam of color, a symbol of yourself.”

On May 30, 1916 Flag Day was officially established by the Proclamation of President Woodrow Wilson.

August 3, 1949, President Truman signed an Act of Congress designating June 14th of each year as National Flag Day.

When the United States flag (Old Glory) becomes worn, torn, faded or badly soiled, it is time to replace it with a new flag, and the old flag should be “retired” with all the dignity and respect befitting our nation’s flag. The traditional method of retirement is to incinerate the flag. The American Legion Post #130 in LaBelle is hosting the Retirement Ceremony at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, June 14 behind the Legion. Everyone is invited to come to the ceremony, all military veterans, families and children, young and old alike.

Every Day but especially on Flag Day, everyone, personal homes and businesses throughout the country are encouraged to fly our Flag. Let’s all show our support for our freedom, country and flag. The American Legion Post 130 is located at 699 SR80 West, across from the Shell station. For further information call 863-675-8300. The public is welcome.

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